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 New world records: 1000km, 24h, 200m low altitude

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T O P I C    R E V I E W
knud Posted - 08/02/2009 : 07:51:48
This first weekend in august three new recumbent world records and one european record were set in Germany (pending approval by WHPVA/IHPVA): On Friday evening (July 31) Damjan set a new 200m low-altitude record at 107.2km/h. This morning, Christian Ascheberg set a new mark for the 1000km and 24h distances of around 22:22h and 1069km (if I calculated correctly). All records were set at the Eurospeedway Lausitz in Germay, where Damjan set his hour record last year. Damjan also attempted the hour and set a new personal best and European Record at around 87.5km, but did not manage to break Sam's new mark.

WHPVA will get the reports soon and will do a quick analysis and ratification.

Cheers, Knud
(HPV Germany and WHPVA record committee)
25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Alan Krause Posted - 02/09/2010 : 08:51:11
Rules and procedures for world record attempts under IHPVA sanction are available on the IHPVA's website here
http://www.ihpva.org/rules.htm

also this
http://www.ihpva.org/rules.htm#record%20guide




Upright Mike Posted - 02/08/2010 : 14:55:51
Hi Jeff,
Until an official observers report is submitted to the IHPVA records committee for approval, Christian's record and the others are still "unofficial". Obviously the 1069 km in 24 hours could later be shown to be the record. However no paperwork in the form of an Observers Report with lap counts, timer certification, course survey etc, witnessed by IHPVA observers was submitted to the IHPVA. Neither do i know if a report was forwarded to the WHPVA

The current recognized IHPVA mark is 1041.25 km in 24 hours set by Greg Kolodziejzyk in the vehicle, Critical Power, 17-Jul-06.
During the same run, he tranversed 1000 km in 23:02:00.

I am a big fan of this sport, and records. All records should be recognized, and I would hope that various divisions around the world would share the details of their attempts with the IHPVA records committee. The IHPVA has recognized records since the modern day human powered speed championships starting in 1975.

Mike Mowett
IHPVA Records Committee
25hz Posted - 02/08/2010 : 05:03:11
http://www.recumbentblog.com/2009/08/09/three-new-recumbent-world-records-one-european-record/

Also, aren't the two wheelers and trikes/multitrack being recorded separately now by the IHPVA/WHPVA/SHPVA/GHPVA/UHPVA?
Jeff NielsenTrisled Posted - 02/07/2010 : 21:01:28
Sorry to drag this one up but i was under the impression that this is that Christian Ascheberg holds the new world record for the 1000km and the 24h distance record can anyone please let me know what the offical record is thanks
DamjanZ Posted - 08/13/2009 : 03:09:05
I need to thank the organizers of the Dekra event truly with all my heart. There was a lot of good will to make the event as racer's friendly as possible. I could choose the lane that would be measured and choose any time to attempt for 1-h during two days. Additionally, I got opportunity to make 200 meters world record on Friday evening, what wasn't planned before and Sunday morning slow riding for taking pictures and videos. The weather really cooperated, the terrain was familiar, what made this event optimistic and relaxing. Not to mention that there was no entry fees, thanks to Dekra and HPV Germany! Special thanks to the Dekra track employees (Uwe, Peter and others), Christian Ascheberg, Martin Exeler and his wife. I discovered Dekra perfect track last year and I hope we can continue our racing tradition there.
Sincerely, Damjan
Upright Mike Posted - 08/09/2009 : 18:46:50
YouTube videos posted by DAMCI1

Damjan 1 Hour Record attempt:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5C8Pdy5996I

Damjan 200-meter low altitude record:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aIga-LbHRM

24-hour Record 1069 km by Christain Ascheberg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mi6NyK7CB0
Upright Mike Posted - 08/07/2009 : 22:50:49
quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

While there is no altitude listing in the IHPVA rules, I thought I remembered it being something like 700 ft and under for the low altitude, but there was talk of moving it up to 800 ft?



Under 700 meters is still considered low-altitude
knud Posted - 08/06/2009 : 14:30:04
quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

Understandably, there might be a misinterpretation due to language, that's cool. By "standardization", I'm referring to description of the class. As for the HPVA, that, to my understanding, was a North American proxy for the IHPVA, and it used the IHPVA definitions



No, since there has never been a "restricted" class definition internationally. So everyone made up their own. Some more similar, some not. World championships are always run with their own class definitions, usually depending on where they are hosted. In my eyes: A big mess.

quote:

Also, your results are going to be submitted to all the "international" HPV committees (and I don't know how many there are any more, 2? 3?) for ratification?



No, the WHPVA is the international organisation, with delegates from all member states. The WHPVA record committee will make a rule suggestion and the board will try to get a unanimous vote on it. I assume that the national committees (currently 10) will then adopt these rules. I hope that the rules will be so convincing that IHPVA will adopt them, too. I would like to avoid a separation of rules and record lists between IHPVA and WHPVA, if there is supposed to be a chance for a re-unification towards an international organisation, *including* north america (once tempers and egos have come back to socially acceptable standards).

Knud
DamjanZ Posted - 08/06/2009 : 12:13:47
I use similar device since 2005 for training and warming up. One trainer is in California, the second version I made in Europe in 2006. I modified it 6 months ago into what you can see now. I saw Sam's system at Ford first time, I didn't have even time to look at it closely.
Damjan
quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

Cool. I guess Damjan came up with his own version of a strap on trainer for the streamer similar to what the Varna gang did at Ford.

25hz Posted - 08/06/2009 : 05:49:14
quote:
Originally posted by knud

quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

Excellent. I guess that'll be, what, 5 different labels/classes for the same vehicle now. Good thing some standardization is proceeding nicely.



What do you mean? That there are several definitions on what a partially faired vehicle is? Well, that has a long discussion history, but the European + Australian definitions were always quite close to another. So we are making a push to find a definition and name that will then be or can be adapted by the national organisations. The HPVA-definition always stuck out. So it seems this is another North America vs. The Rest Of The World issue. But maybe our eventual suggestion might be found interesting to the HPVA, too.

And this is not about standardisation, but about setting a single limit on construction, but not on fantasy... But I guess that is what you meant.

Knud



Understandably, there might be a misinterpretation due to language, that's cool. By "standardization", I'm referring to description of the class. As for the HPVA, that, to my understanding, was a North American proxy for the IHPVA, and it used the IHPVA definitions - it didn't make up it's own. Also, your results are going to be submitted to all the "international" HPV committees (and I don't know how many there are any more, 2? 3?) for ratification?
legslarry Posted - 08/05/2009 : 03:19:43
quote:
Originally posted by knud
Btw. did any serious recumbent bike contender try to break the Lands End to John o'Groats record? Currently is is held by a petty tricycle with a mere 34km/h average.



Not to my knowledge, though coincidentally Olympians James Cracknell and Rebecca Romero have just had a go at the mixed tandem record currently held by Wilko & Miss L.E.A Taylor (who I think is called Lynn and also holds the womens solo record). They were obliged to pack somewhere in darkest Scotland yesterday after La Romero started suffering from knee problems.

I suspect a strong rider in a Quest could probably beat Wilko's record, but I personally wouldn't like to attempt it in anything with fewer than three wheels. Parts of the route have heavy traffic and/or steep hills, and all of it is subject to the vagaries of the BRITONS' weather which, as London-Edinburgh-London so graphically demonstrated last week, can get thoroughly nasty[1] even in the middle of our so-called "summer".

1 - hypothermia, flooding, bikes and riders being blown clean off the road, naked Italians and Mark Hummerstone

Dave Larrington
http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
=============================
a bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
knud Posted - 08/04/2009 : 09:50:27
quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

Excellent. I guess that'll be, what, 5 different labels/classes for the same vehicle now. Good thing some standardization is proceeding nicely.



What do you mean? That there are several definitions on what a partially faired vehicle is? Well, that has a long discussion history, but the European + Australian definitions were always quite close to another. So we are making a push to find a definition and name that will then be or can be adapted by the national organisations. The HPVA-definition always stuck out. So it seems this is another North America vs. The Rest Of The World issue. But maybe our eventual suggestion might be found interesting to the HPVA, too.

And this is not about standardisation, but about setting a single limit on construction, but not on fantasy... But I guess that is what you meant.

Knud
25hz Posted - 08/04/2009 : 09:20:09
quote:
Originally posted by knud

quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

If Hans had finished his 24hrs, I guess the WRRA would have needed to institute a class akin to the HPRA superstreet to recognize it? I would imagine the Dutchmen already have just about all the TTs and distances sewn up already for that.



Hans used his Quest, so no need for a partially faired class there. But we at WHPVA are discussing definitions for a partially faired class right now and might include it in the rules. We seem to be quite close to a consensus that does not exclude obviously good existing ideas but sets sufficient limits to actually provide a real class definition.

Knud



Excellent. I guess that'll be, what, 5 different labels/classes for the same vehicle now. Good thing some standardization is proceeding nicely.
25hz Posted - 08/04/2009 : 09:17:08
quote:
Originally posted by Larry Lem

11.0 LAND RULE AMENDMENTS:

The IHPVA approved the following amendments in 1997 and 1998:
The IHPVA recognizes land speed records divided into two categories: high altitude and low altitude. The division is at 700 meters above sea level.

Larry Lem



Well, of the 4 or 5 different IHPVA/WHPVA sites, I guess I missed the PDF that actually goes down to point #11.
knud Posted - 08/04/2009 : 08:48:36
quote:
Originally posted by 25hz

If Hans had finished his 24hrs, I guess the WRRA would have needed to institute a class akin to the HPRA superstreet to recognize it? I would imagine the Dutchmen already have just about all the TTs and distances sewn up already for that.



Hans used his Quest, so no need for a partially faired class there. But we at WHPVA are discussing definitions for a partially faired class right now and might include it in the rules. We seem to be quite close to a consensus that does not exclude obviously good existing ideas but sets sufficient limits to actually provide a real class definition.

Knud
Larry Lem Posted - 08/04/2009 : 07:46:26
11.0 LAND RULE AMENDMENTS:

The IHPVA approved the following amendments in 1997 and 1998:
The IHPVA recognizes land speed records divided into two categories: high altitude and low altitude. The division is at 700 meters above sea level.


Larry Lem
25hz Posted - 08/04/2009 : 05:26:18
While there is no altitude listing in the IHPVA rules, I thought I remembered it being something like 700 ft and under for the low altitude, but there was talk of moving it up to 800 ft?
25hz Posted - 08/04/2009 : 05:16:54
Interesting that under the IHPVA "Vehicle Classes", section 3.1.7.2 lists "Part faired" as undefined. I guess the groundwork was there to acommodate other land HPVS besides full on streamers, but the rules weren't developed further.

If Hans had finished his 24hrs, I guess the WRRA would have needed to institute a class akin to the HPRA superstreet to recognize it? I would imagine the Dutchmen already have just about all the TTs and distances sewn up already for that.
knud Posted - 08/04/2009 : 04:40:46
quote:
Originally posted by legslarry

quote:
Originally posted by knud

Great race pics at http://bent-design.com/wr/



Probably to avoid London-Edinburgh-London




Probably... Btw. did any serious recumbent bike contender try to break the Lands End to John o'Groats record? Currently is is held by a petty tricycle with a mere 34km/h average.

Knud
gregk Posted - 08/03/2009 : 06:32:30
quote:
Originally posted by knud

quote:
Originally posted by gregk

wow - awesome job Christian! I guess I have another goal...



I think you'd be very happy on a race track like the Eurospeedway or similar. Long, smooth, zero G-forces. The next numerologically interesting mark I guess is the 30mph average, and then 49.700km/h (the UCI hour record, but for a whole day) and 50km/h average...

Did you notice any particular points of improvement during your record performance? Anything where you think you can organize better so that you can output more power? Or would you need better ambient conditions, i.e. weather, tarmac quality, track layout, roling resistance, lower drag? Because 24h is probably the distance with the most parameters that can and need to be adjusted.

Cheers, Knud




I think a longer, smoother track would do it. Possibly also slightly smaller frontal area, but comfort is so important for 24 hours. I'm not sure it would be possible in a Varna - you would go crazy.
legslarry Posted - 08/03/2009 : 05:34:49
quote:
Originally posted by knud

Great race pics at http://bent-design.com/wr/



Probably to avoid London-Edinburgh-London

Dave Larrington
http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
=============================
a bit ov a lyv wyr by slof standirds
knud Posted - 08/03/2009 : 04:16:20
quote:
Originally posted by Jeff NielsenTrisled

firstly congrats to christian

secondly
is there a rule that if you going to attempt this record and if you break it that your only allowed to break it by 20km or so.



Nope, 1m is enough.

quote:

plus where can i find info on the regulations for this record.



Try http://www.ihpva.eu/IHPVA/CompRule3.PDF. The new WHPVA web pages are not up yet.

quote:

p.s. i read that chritian attempted this record before at a 250meter track i did 12 hours on one and i can tell you that there is 5 small bumps and 2 big bumps on the first bend. If your thinking about riding on an indoor velodrome for an extended time think very long and hard about it



I would even discurage people from doing it. 12/24h are 50% a mental challenge, from what I learned from people, and the rest is physical. Of course technology and organisation make up another 50%...

[/quote]
Jeff NielsenTrisled Posted - 08/03/2009 : 02:17:28
firstly congrats to christian

secondly
is there a rule that if you going to attempt this record and if you break it that your only allowed to break it by 20km or so.

plus where can i find info on the regulations for this record.


p.s. i read that chritian attempted this record before at a 250meter track i did 12 hours on one and i can tell you that there is 5 small bumps and 2 big bumps on the first bend. If your thinking about riding on an indoor velodrome for an extended time think very long and hard about it

knud Posted - 08/03/2009 : 00:36:12
quote:
Originally posted by gregk

wow - awesome job Christian! I guess I have another goal...



I think you'd be very happy on a race track like the Eurospeedway or similar. Long, smooth, zero G-forces. The next numerologically interesting mark I guess is the 30mph average, and then 49.700km/h (the UCI hour record, but for a whole day) and 50km/h average...

Did you notice any particular points of improvement during your record performance? Anything where you think you can organize better so that you can output more power? Or would you need better ambient conditions, i.e. weather, tarmac quality, track layout, roling resistance, lower drag? Because 24h is probably the distance with the most parameters that can and need to be adjusted.

Cheers, Knud
knud Posted - 08/03/2009 : 00:26:16
quote:
Originally posted by 25hz
What was Hans riding for, just for fun or was he going for a record of some kind too?



He tried the 24h, too. But he was troubled with flat tires and in the end his ceramic bearings ground him to a stop, so he aborted.

Knud

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