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 Lunatic Fringe 3.0 Streetliner

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T O P I C    R E V I E W
LunaticFringe Posted - 11/18/2017 : 17:05:11
WOW! I've been out of the game for a while. It's time to jump back in.

I had gotten up to 299.9 pounds, which scared me, and now I'm down to 230. By May, I'll hopefully be around 199.9. A 100 pound loss would be cool! I'm riding fast again and feeling GREAT. In the past few years, my town, Tucson, AZ, has built an amazing system of bike-friendly trails with no cars around (about 100 miles worth) and this streetliner will be a blast to cruise on it. I will also attend a few velodrome races with you guys, hopefully in 2018. Wahoo!


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I weighed about 280 pounds when I was riding 2.0. It was so fast that I allowed it to trick me into thinking that I was still fit at that weight. Hah!



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This project will start off with the same bike that I had used for 2.0, pictured below. It is the Steintrikes Speedster FS. The full suspension makes it a dream to ride on rough roads and it was really fast with the old fairing on it. The old fairing was HUGE. The new one will be much lighter and easier to transport. It has the Schlumpf High Speed Drive for the higher gearing needed for a streamlined bike.









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This new fairing will be constructed of a mix of an existing fiberglass fairing and fabric-over-rib construction, similar to Rick Gritters' awesome ride. I will be learning from the DVD available from GA Boats. It shows every step about how to build fabric-over-rib boats, like an 8 pound canoe. http://www.gaboats.com/


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The nose fairing arrives soon (pictured below, on a trike). I got it on eBay at a delivered price approx. $123. Made by Midnor Mold. It seems to be a decent shape to start with and I can easily modify it to suit my needs. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Recumbent-Bicycle-Nose-Cone-Recumbent-Fairing-Recumbent-Nose-/263269950942



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I set up my work area today so that I can begin the process. This won't be a mad rush and I'll start by making a stand for the bike so that it sits on top of the work table. I figure that I'll be done in a couple of easy months' work this winter.





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I no longer use a factory for my business activities. I only sell my product designs online using about 35 websites. I mostly sell traffic related security products and fake rock waterfalls for swimming pools. I'll be building this streetliner at a house where I operate the business from. I have still messed around with fiberglass over the years and recently made a ram air system for the Harley that WORKS GREAT.





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There won't be a techinical, dimensioned drawing for this build... I'm just going to wing-it and post pics along the way. It seems that the fabric-over-rib construction will be affordable and light. Since I'll be a newbie at that type of construction, I won't lock myself into a technical drawing.

I'll post more pics as it develops over the next couple of months. Next post might be in a week or two.

Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
Lunatic Fringe 3.0
25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Jerry Posted - 12/16/2017 : 16:26:14
Just ordered the 2nd nose cone. Thanks for the link Jeff. I will order 2 more nose cones after the 1st of the year.
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/16/2017 : 15:52:16
Today's shape study confirms that I can leave the body profile at the seat as it is. The curves have a decent profile, none of which interfere with cycling action of my legs.



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This shows that my legs will comfortably come to rest at a stop. I will be leaving a fairly large opening at the bottom for my legs and cooling. Much of this bicycle's use will be during temperatures over 95 degrees (Arizona desert heat). I may build a closure underneath for a velodrome race. ;) (Note to self: the point where my knee can make contact with the rib is 10" in front of the steering tube, 7" from the boom.)



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So far, I'm pretty pleased with the shape study. There is a long way to go, but the progress is fun!

Thanks for checking it all out.

I will do more in the coming week. For tonight, I have a crazy Christmas party to go to... a beautiful woman is waiting for me to break free and begin the weekend fun!

Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/16/2017 : 15:42:05
quote:
Originally posted by Jerry

Jeff, check out Dr.Joel Fuhrman's book "Eat to Live". Eat all you want and never gain weight. It saved my life 7 years ago. My neighbor lost 97 pounds in less than 8 months and was never hungry. Back to bike building now!



Thanks, Jerry! I do the keto diet. It is SUPER easy for me to stick with, and a very healthy way to eat. The keto diet makes a lot of cyclists cringe since it means that I burn fat for fuel, instead of carbs. I cheat when cycling, though... I use UCAN slow-digest carbs during a ride so that I burn both fat and carbs. It works GREAT.

Jeff
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/16/2017 : 15:39:50
quote:
Originally posted by Speedbiker

Hi Jeff. Fun project, but can you pull those elbows in?



I completely understand your question. ;)

My elbows don't go any wider than my shoulders now, so if I bring the elbows in a touch more, I'll have a similar width issue. I'm trying to keep in mind that it is a streetliner, used 99% of the time on bike paths with a couple of races per year thrown in. I'm shooting for a bit more comfort so that the bike will actually get used a lot. Hah! Comfort and speed are trying to be balanced with comfort doing a lot of winning.

Jeff
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/16/2017 : 15:37:00
quote:
Originally posted by nickyfitz

You look like a new man. Fantastic! Big respect!

Nick



Much appreciated, sir! I have about 28 pounds to go now, and feel mighty fine. Jeff
Jerry Posted - 12/16/2017 : 14:58:30
Jeff, check out Dr.Joel Fuhrman's book "Eat to Live". Eat all you want and never gain weight. It saved my life 7 years ago. My neighbor lost 97 pounds in less than 8 months and was never hungry. Back to bike building now!
Speedbiker Posted - 12/16/2017 : 13:35:28
Hi Jeff. Fun project, but can you pull those elbows in?
nickyfitz Posted - 12/16/2017 : 02:45:14
I'm enjoying following the progress of your project Jeff. Good luck with it. But mostly I wanted to applaud your massive weight loss. That's very impressive and it must have taken a huge effort and self discipline. You look like a new man. Fantastic! Big respect!

Nick

Previous bikes:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/139728134@N08/albums/72157673027547665
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/15/2017 : 19:44:08
It's time to make the major fiberglass mid-section that defines the maximum shape of my torso and arms, basically being the half-way structure.

Before I made the template on the seat, I went to the store to think about ways to build the frame that extends out from the nose fairing. I did see affordable moulding strips that would work well, but I still decided to go with foam so the the transitions in the fabric are more rounded and hopefully more aero. I brought two sheets home and stuck them in the tarp walls of my shed. Magically, the wind noise from the tarps is gone now. Hah!



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To create the mid-section template (will create fiberglass that bolts to the back of the seat), I taped a piece of cardboard to the seat and sat on it. I then had dear old Mom trace around me as I sat. It certainly was a lot faster to have her help! I'm so glad that I get to take care of her as she gets older.



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After drawing the centerline on the tape in the picture above, I removed the template and folded it in half, along that line. I trimmed off where either side overlapped so the I'd have a great symmetry in the template after I taped it back on.

It is now back on the seat, ready to fiberglass against the back side tomorrow. I'll use a mold release so that it pops free and I can hold it in place with a few bolts. After that, it will have foam added to the profile edge so that I can sculpt it to be about 3" thick in cross section. That will be a place where the fabric's stretch frame gets major support, turning to the rearward tear drop shape.

After losing 72 pounds, my shoulders are now 22" wide. I have made the template to be 24" wide. I guess that I'll always punch a big hole into the wind. ;)



Edit: I will probably add some cardboard back to the template underneath my elbow areas so that the shape drops more simplistically downward... easier to form the fabric to. I need to get a long 1/2" PVC pipe tomorrow to lay a curve from the front to the back to get a look-see.

Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
Jerry Posted - 12/13/2017 : 13:27:34
I just bought one of the nose cones. If I like it, I'll buy 2-3 more. I don't want my other bikes to get jealous.
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/12/2017 : 14:17:12
quote:
Originally posted by Jerry

Looks good Jeff. Are you going to use rubber under the pvc? Helps keep it from vibrating and scratching the paint, I think, maybe not.



Thanks, Jerry. I'm just using electrical tape under the PVC where the hose clamps are located. I'm not too concerned about scratches, etc. The bike is already 'broken in'. Hah!

Jeff
Jerry Posted - 12/11/2017 : 16:31:44
Looks good Jeff. Are you going to use rubber under the pvc? Helps keep it from vibrating and scratching the paint, I think, maybe not.
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/11/2017 : 16:21:50
I finalized the fiberglass overlay onto the mount system. I weighed the fairing with its mount at 6.2 pounds. It is crazy-stout! ;)



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Back onto the bike, it is a TOUGH l'il bastard. This thing is going to hold up to the shrinking process.



Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/10/2017 : 18:33:40
Jerry, it's a great fairing to start with. ;)

Stix, thanks for following... I'm jealous of YOUR P on B!

Hypercycle, I did not weigh anything yet. The fairing is pretty light, maybe around 3 pounds. My mounts will probably double that weight. They're beefy.

I held off from completely finishing the front fairing mount tonight so that the 'glass could fully harden before I remove it from the bike. After removal, I will finish laminating all PVC with fiberglass, including the surfaces that the hose clamps contact. I could make it slightly lighter by thickening the fiberglass over the PVC, then cut it open and remove the PVC, but I'll leave it in and use its strength as it is.

This picture shows glued PVC prior to laminating. The whole thing seemed quite solid at this point.



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This last photo shows where I stopped with the lamination. It's enough to have it all locked together where it won't move out of alignment after removal. At this point, the front fairing is like a ROCK. It doesn't budge. No wobble or flex. I will add minor triangulation where you see the red line tomorrow. I finish the lamination on the work table. I believe that the fiberglass overlay will allow the front fairing to resist distortion from the shrinking Dacron.



Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
hypercycle Posted - 12/10/2017 : 17:16:06
Do you have an approximate weight for that nose cone? And your mountings?

Thanks

pamminger
stix Posted - 12/10/2017 : 02:14:32
Very interesting project. Really enjoying the photos and description as you progress.

Stix

Peregrin on Birk (Birk Comet RT with full fairing)
Lightning F-40 (built around R-84 frame)
Soma Smoothie Upright
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/09/2017 : 19:17:27
The nose cone is now on, in its correct position. The mounting process isn't finished, yet, but it will be by tomorrow night! I still need to finalize the upper mount and connect the lower and upper mounts with a PVC tube. All will be laminated under a layer of fiberglass. The mount will be slightly more stout than if I was just using the front fairing by itself. The shrinking of Dacron polyester over the fiberglass framework WILL introduce shrink and I need some OOMPH to resist that force.

This picture shows the meticulous, uber-scientific processes involved in streetliner construction. You need a towel, heat gun and a wooden stick. Aw, yeah... primitive!



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This is the current level of mount construction. The forward, lower fairing mount PVC has no adhesive yet. It has been allowed to pivot and adapt to changes. It will be adhered as-is, without taking it apart, then be laminated under a layer of fiberglass.



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Rear view of front fairing. Currently, there is no foot strike, but it is really close!



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OMG... it actually LOOKS like it is located in the sweet spot. Aw. Yeah.



Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/08/2017 : 22:19:10
Tonight I altered 1 1/4" PVC pipe T fittings to become the mounts for the front nose fairing. Next, I'll install unaltered T fittings into the nose top and bottom, leaving them loose to rotate in some pipe. That will make it easier to make adjustments for fit. After finding the best location, I'll mark the tubing and fittings, gluing them together at the successful position. PVC pipe is super cheap and easy to use for fairing mounts. I've done it for years with no failures.



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The arrow shows where I ground away material to get the hose clamp to seat properly.



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Short video of mounts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8UI872YIRY

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I might finish putting the fairing on in the morning and take the bike for a short rip afterward.

Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
Jerry Posted - 12/05/2017 : 20:26:47
I am liking the little nose cone Jeff. I am thinking about getting 2 of them, one for my corovelo, and one for my next streamliner. Hard to beat $123.
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/05/2017 : 16:19:26
Sitting outside in the temporary workshop, my brain has started spinning about the best way to connect the nose fairing and then reach out from there to build the rest of the frame for the fabric that follows. I might be going with sculpted fiberglass armatures, instead of traditional ribs, to cut down on angularity of the support shapes that will define contours through the fabric. I am thinking that a gunwhale at the seat profile will work great for identifying the maximum shape of where I sit and it will be easy to have someone trace my profile against a template.

https://youtu.be/frnCrH5DJD8

I actually have stuff to do now! Along with attaching the nose fairing, I now have everything I need to do my practice work with mounting, tightening, and finishing the Dacron fabric onto the wood-framed practice structure.

Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/05/2017 : 14:55:23
The nose fairing from Midnor Mold arrived today! It took about 2 weeks to arrive by way of slow boat, as expected. I got it from them on eBay for only $123. What a GREAT deal. The pic with the fairing shown at the front of the bike is a bit high, but when you use your Mom as a prop holder, you've got to be quick.

The package took MANY hits from irritable shipping guys, had ruptures, etc., but the cheap wooden frame inside was smartly inserted into the box. The product arrived in perfect condition.



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Jeff Bales
Tucson, AZ
LunaticFringe Posted - 12/02/2017 : 19:53:13
So, I took the Speedster out for the first time today, after not riding her for about 5 years. For now, I've got a new Primo tire on the front and a Kojak on the back.



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I had almost forgotten how FUN this bike is. I can blast over speed bumps without ever slowing down! What a cushy ride.

I experimented with a new arm position. With my old way of riding, I can feel a LOT of air hitting my arms as I ride with them relaxed at my side, handlebar just above my upper thighs. I found that I can kill that rush of air on my arms by positioning them forward and still have good control with the current handlebars.

I rotated the brake levers upward, and lowered the handlebar on the stem. It all works out to where I can still see over my hands and there is good clearance with the handlebar over my lower thigh/knee area. I am going to move the Grip shift to the central vertical tube, between the grips. In the forward position, the cushy grips become supports for the wrist as my hands cradle the brake levers. It's actually pretty comfortable. Arrow at shifter. X will be new location.



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I accidentally took a photo while messing with my phone that shows the condition of the 130 miles of Loop bike trail that circles Tucson, Arizona. Gotta love it!



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I comfortably rode at 18-21 mph on the downward section of trail along the river, 14-17 on the upward return. About a 2 1/2 hour tour today. Everything checks out on the bike.

Edit update 12/5/17: After riding for a while, this new configuration seems to work great, leaving my view to the front unobstructed with my arms mostly straight forward.



Jeff Bales
Tucson, Az
Balor Posted - 11/22/2017 : 14:30:17
Good! Hopefully mine will turn out allright as well.

https://pp.userapi.com/c840723/v840723049/26e69/rYTmOktw7pk.jpg
LunaticFringe Posted - 11/22/2017 : 12:05:41
quote:
Originally posted by Balor

Very interesting forks you have there. How do they behave when braking?



I've had women with baby strollers do unplanned U-turns right in front of me on bike trails, forcing me to nail the brakes hard to avoid a splatter. I never had loss of control and appreciated the stability.

Jeff
Balor Posted - 11/22/2017 : 11:36:54
Very interesting forks you have there. How do they behave when braking? I plan similar trailing link front forks for MBB bent, but I've heard scary things about LOTS of brake dive such construction entails.

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