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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2013 :  19:15:55  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I don't normally do things like top 10 lists, but it seems like a popular thing to do. So, I'd like to do a Top 10 of human powered achievements for 2013.

Off the top of my head I can name a few. U of T's human powered helicopter feat, the latest Battle Mountain 200 meter record, Greg K's HPB feat, U of T's flapping HP aircraft... Hmm what else?

When we get 10 good candidates I will arbitrarily order them and then add this as a post on the recumbents.com homepage.

-Warren.

Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  05:42:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
warren, I was thinking the same thing and even started a list already!
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  06:39:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Top Human Powered Achievements for 2013.

Foreword: Views and opinions in this list are my own! Factual data is based on my years of keeping statistics on human powered vehicle data. Over this past year I’ve had contact with many of the individuals and teams on this list. I’ve been sent emails and data from some of the European events. I've also attended Battle Mountain, so was a first-hand witness to some of these events. All world or national records that I mention must be considered unofficial until they are recognized by the IHPVA or WHPVA. In all cases where I mention a RECORD its simply my acknowledge that it is the best ever performance in that category, whether or not the category officially exists in the IHPVA/WHPVA.

1) AeroVelo / University of Toronto team members winning the $250,000 Sikorsky prize for Human Powered helicopter flight, something that took 33 years to achieve. They achieved a flight that met the rules requiring a flight of at least one minute duration, a maximum altitude of ten feet at one point during the flight, and stayed within a 10 x 10 meter square to demonstrate control. Students and graduates of University of Toronto designed and built their helicopter, called the Atlas in only 3 months, then spent 9 months testing (and crashing it). Their technological achievements earned them major press in worldwide publications. Their prize achievement was voted the Number 8 technological achievement in the entire world in Dec 2013 (hence its #1 on this list!). Todd Reichert was the pilot on the prize winning flight, as he was on their snowbird human powered flapping wing ornithopter in 2010, another world first. He generated over one horsepower, with peak power required in the first part of the flight to climb to the ten foot altitude. Close to the ground, ground effect from the rotor downwash helped produce lift. Both devices fulfilled 500-year old designs first proposed by Leonardo daVinci of allowing humans to fly. They also relied on the successful teamwork of team members forged during four years of building four human powered streamliners for the ASME student human powered vehicle competition. Todd Reichert and Cameron Robertson are the two founding members of AeroVelo. They had a successful Kickstarter campaign to raise funds necessary to build the Atlas. The team flew at the Toronto indoor soccer center. The four quad rotor Atlas was the largest human powered helicopter ever built, yet was very lightweight. It may be the 2nd largest helicopter ever built. They designed an ingenious control system that pulled on the blades using wires attached to the Cervelo (also a Toronto company) bicycle that the rider sat on in an upright riding position. This was to maintain flight. It was designed almost by accident after an earlier control system wasn't working right. Like other few teams trying for the prize, including Maryland (see #4) below, they had to endure several crashes, and setbacks. In the late 1970’s, human powered flights of the Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross by designed by Paul MacCready and Aerovironment in California and flown by Bryan Allen also generated the same worldwide publicity as the University of Toronto earned with their human powered orintopher in 2010 and now their human powered helicopter 2013 achievements. Such achievements are recognized far beyond the human powered racing community.

2) Human Powered Team Delft (students from TU Delft and the University of Amsterdam) setting a new world speed record of (133.78 kph, 83.13 mph) breaking Team Varna and Sam Whittingham's 13 year reign as the top speed record holder. This was the culmination of three years of work and three different vehicles that TU Delft built, each vehicle going over 80 mph powered by Sebastiaan Bowier. Delft achieved what student teams first did at the beginning of the IHPVA racing, that is get the overall top speed record. This was first accomplished by Northrop University in the late 1970's when they consistency had the top speed record with student designers and strong Olympic athletes. (Note: the three fastest student teams in history (Delft, Toronto, IUT Annecy) were at Battle Mountain this year, the second year in a row that happened, and each team set their fastest speeds ever) This in itself, might be considered a sub-achievement. Since the Dupont Prize was won in 1986, only a handful of people can lay claim to being the world's fastest human. This list is Fred Markham (1986), Chris Huber (1992), Sam Whittingham (2000), Sebastiaan Bowier (2013).

3) Maria Parker's RAAM win in the female recumbent category on a Cruzbike recumbent after losing almost a day due to her support van being damaged. This is a story of perseverance and a win after a setback. An intriguing human interest story that was closely followed by hundreds of members of the recumbent community online throughout the week of racing. RAAM is considered one of the hardest racing and athletic events in the world, with athletes racing for as many hours a day as they can for about ten days straight (in the single rider division) to cross the continent, a nearly 3000 mile journey. Maria's husband Jim Parker is one of the designers and owners of the successful Cruzbike line or recumbents. Their designs feature a moving bottom bracket front wheel drive recumbent. So like the other people at the top of this list, they had an active role in the design and building of the product they raced.

4) University of Maryland’s human powered helicopter flight world records in the first half of the year. They had the endurance record with I believe a 47 second to 57 second flight, and achieved the maximum altitude records before Toronto set its records and achieved the Sikorsky prize. Maryland was leading the battle. There battle was depicted in the article that aired just before the prize was won. They had a female rider on some flights, and a hand and foot powered machine. The Gamera helicopter is itself, an enormous technological and athletic human powered achievement, which the team had spent more than several years working on and flying. Only a small number of machines worldwide had ever achieved a working human powered helicopter, and University of Maryland's was the best in the world at the beginning of the year.

5) Graeme Obree's successful Prone bicycle, called the Beastie, built by himself racing at Battle Mountain for the first time. While it was not the fastest vehicle it will likely be (after the movie comes out, see below) be one of the most famous vehicles that’s ever raced at Battle Mountain. Nor perhaps was it the most technological well built. This is a characteristic of Obree who builds stuff with the aid of parts repurposed from household items without the aid of advanced fabrication methods. In this case a frying pan for the Beastie Prone, earlier a washing machine bearing for his world record setting upright bike Old faithful. He was supposed to show up last year, but it got delayed until this year. Graeme Obree is arguably the most famous cyclist to ever race at Battle Mountain. He is known worldwide to millions of bicyclists, a national hero in Scotland and one of the foremost proponents of thinking outside the box in bicycle design and racing. Hence he was welcomed in the human powered streamlined racing community, because it is itself a group of unconventional bicycle designers. His achievements in the realm of conventional UCI bicycle racing were extraordinary in 1993 and 1994, when he twice set the world one-hour record and world 4000-meter pursuit record on the track on his own unconventional upright bicycle using unique handlebar positions. This led to a later ban by the UCI against aerobars. He was a world champion and a film and book made about his life called the Flying Scotsman. As of Dec 2013, it has just been announced that 20,000 British pounds has been raised by Journey publications to make a movie called “The Outsider” which will document the past two years of Graeme Obree’s journey to the United States to race in the World Human powered Speed Challenge. What Graeme did achieve was the setting of the Fastest Single Rider Prone Vehicle record, a Scottish National record, and the fastest vehicle with a sort of Linear drive mechanism, and perhaps fastest vehicle with a Fixed Gear. No serious prone machines had been attempted since the early days of the IHPVA, from about 1975 and 1976 when Ralph Therrio and later Dr. Alan Abbott had the overall top speed record, and in 1983-1984 when Steve Ball’s machine was the fastest prone.

Edited by - Upright Mike on 12/20/2013 11:37:10
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  08:01:13  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Trisled site claims:
Vehicle: Completely Overzealous
World multitrack single rider 1-hour distance record (2013), Ford proving ground Australia, 71.79 MPH (115 KPH), Rider Gareth Hanks

72 MPH for an hour?? Isn't that faster than the Euro 1 hour records?

I am thinking that this should have been 71.79 KPH (44MPH) and that their web person had a bit of a mixup. I'll try to get Ben to give us the real numbers.

Edited by - warren on 12/19/2013 08:12:32
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  09:42:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by warren

Trisled site claims:
Vehicle: Completely Overzealous
World multitrack single rider 1-hour distance record (2013), Ford proving ground Australia, 71.79 MPH (115 KPH), Rider Gareth Hanks

72 MPH for an hour?? Isn't that faster than the Euro 1 hour records?

I am thinking that this should have been 71.79 KPH (44MPH) and that their web person had a bit of a mixup. I'll try to get Ben to give us the real numbers.

This is their 200 meter record at Battle Mountain. Yes, I have two One Hour Trike records (pending approval of course by the IHPVA) that Gareth set this past year. Those are on List too.
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  14:48:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
6) Gareth Hank’s Two World Records for One-Hour in the Single-Rider Trike Category. These were set seven months apart using the Completely Overzealous, a Tad-Pole trike, with two wheels enclosed, narrow track velomobile, with rear wheel drive and head bubble. Gareth was the principal designer and fabricator of this bike, with some collaboration with TriSled. Both times he rode at the Ford You-Yang’s Proving Grounds near Lara, Australia. This achievement built on the success that he had in September 2012 at Battle Mountain, when he set the Trike Top speed four times, becoming the first trike to exceed 70 mph. His achievements:
Record #1: (71.376 km, 44.351 miles) March 31, 2013: Gareth beat previous best single-rider trike mark set by Daniel Fenn’s by 5.5 km. Set a new Australian One-Hour Record, beating Ben Goodall’s mark set earlier in the day. At that time, it was the 2nd best trike mark behind Vector Tandem's, made him the 20th fastest one-hour rider, and was the 46th best mark ever on the All-time lists
Record #2: (73.800 km, 45.857 miles) November 1, 2013: Gareth beat his previous mark by over 2 km, set a new Australian National One Hour record, At that time, it was the 2nd best trike mark behind Vector Tandem's, made him the 20th fastest one-hour rider, and was the 42th best mark ever on the All-time lists.
Official records were just recently recognized by the IHPVA in the Trike/Multitrack category. This category had not seen significant improvement in a long time. Prior to this, the best Trike mark was Daniel Fenn who rode (correction based on new RDW lap distance of 2.775 km for bikes in 2013, versue 2.85 km in 2012) 65.705 km, 40.828 miles 67.481km, 41.931 miles in his self-designed Evo-V Velomobile on the RDW Track in winning CycleVision 2012. (This year Daniel rode 67.278 km, 41.805 miles, faster). Before this, Gerhardt Scheller held the long-standing Single-rider Trike mark from 1987 when he set a 100 KM record 40.86 65.76 km. As of this year, Gareth’s two marks and Daniels’ two marks are the only ones to exceed Gerhardt’s mark from 1987. Note Chuck Royalty was on 43.6 mph pace for 48 minutes in the Orion trike in 2009 at the Ford track, before a part failure that occurred during shipping of the trike occurred . (*all records still pending approval).

7) Team Cieo’s Multiple Rider (Tandem) One Hour record (83.013 km, 51.582 miles) at Dekra, a smashing the 33 year old Vector Tandem record of (74.51 km, 46.3 miles) from 1980. This first-year student-built design from ETH-Zurich or the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich is now the 4th fastest student team on the planet, and they have not attended Battle Mountain yet. Ruben Koch, Dominik Dusek 32 & 29 years old were the strong amateurs that powered the bike. They became the 7th best individual or team on the all-time Hour record list at the Dekra World Record Weekend 2013, Friday July 26, 2013 They were riding a new bike in less than ideal (very hot) conditions. Later in the weekend, the supposedly “stronger” team was riding hard for another possible One Hour record when they crashed at Dekra. The Cieo Tandem may be ushering in a new type of design with their vehicle in which one rider lays below the other The captain is in a supine position elevated above stoker who is laying on his back in a headfirst position. They power independent drivetrains.
They’ve demonstrated the same dramatic improvement in their record category, as has been seen in other records categories in the past few years. (examples of other big improvements: Single-Rider Trike in 200-meters and One-Hour by Gareth Hanks in 2012 & 2103, Multiple Rider 200-meters by the Glowworm in 2012 & 2013, Women’s records in the 200-meters and One-Hour in 2009 & 2010 by Barbara Buatois). The Vector Tandem’s record rewrote the history books when it was set, as only a few years earlier, teams were just breaking the same speeds in the 200-meters, and by 1980, they were able to hold that speed for One-Hour. And prior to that, the best One-Hour distance was only about 31.8 miles by Ron Skarin in the Teledyne Titan.

8) University of Toronto’s BlueNose incredible speed on Saturday morning at Battle Mountain, with three riders doing (123 to 125 kph, 76.5 to 77.7 mph) and four over 70 mph. This was like a lightning bolt out of the blue, my initial feeling was astonishment when I saw the times reported from that Saturday morning at Battle Mountain. Only Team Delft can claim three riders (Sebastian, Wil, Jan Bos) went that fast (over 76 mph), but not all in the same machine (VeloX1,2,3), and not all in the same year. The BlueNose’s performance was not entirely unexpected, but it solidified their placing as a legitimate contender to the top-speed record. The team was organized enough to pack up, speed 6 miles up the highway and send another rider, then another down Hwy 305 with all of them setting personal bests. The BlueNose started life in 2012 as an ASME streamliner, and had multiple problems with handling crashing at the ASME races. Back then it had plastic windshield, then after significant testing at the Ford track this summer, it became a hard-shelled top made of carbon with a camera vision system. Its vision system pioneered by Oleksiy Ryndin won an Innovation award at Battle Mountain. BlueNose went through extensive sanding and prep work throughout the week. Todd Reichert had a big crash in it from a radial tire problem. Speeds were slow in the 40 to 50 mph range in the beginning of the week. The team first went 60 mph on Wed. At some point during the week, they added a vertical stabilizer fin. Trefor and Todd went 64 and 68 mph on Thursday. Then on Friday morning, Todd smashed his personal best and the team best with a 74 mph run, Cameron followed that with a 68 mph run, and Calvin did a 71 mph run, but then on Saturday morning, after a paint job overnight, these were the astonishing results, in the order that they happened.
Todd Reichert (125.02 kph, 77.68 mph) made University of Toronto the 2nd fastest student built team in history (by 0.005 sec), 2nd fastest Canadian athlete behind Sam Whittingham, ranked 7th in world after 2013 event
Cameron Robertson (113.82 kph, 70.72 mph), became the 5th fastest Canadian, and ranked 26th in the world after the 2013 event.
Calvin Moes (123.12 kph, 76.5 mph) 21 years old 2nd fastest student athlete in history (currently attending classes at the undergraduate level), 4th fastest Canadian, 1st time rider at Battle Mountain, ranked 12th in world after 2013 event
Trefor Evans (123.67 kph, 76.84 mph) 21 years old, Fastest student athlete in history (currently attending classes at the undergraduate level), 3rd fastest Canadian, ranked 11th in world after 2013 event
These achievements eared all four riders new hats. Todd, Trefor and Calvin got 75 mph hats, and Cameron a 70 mph hat.

9) The three fastest student-teams in history all setting bests at Battle Mountain. TU Delft, University of Toronto, and IUT Annecy. They each have 3 or 4 years of experience now at Battle Mountain. The 0.05 mph difference between Toronto and IUT Annecy. As mentioned above, the student history of producing fast-speed bikes was strongly renewed in the past few years at Battle Mountain, and this year was the best ever. Delft achieved what student teams first did at the beginning of the IHPVA racing, that is get the overall top speed record. This was first accomplished by Northrop University in the late 1970's when they consistency had the top speed record with student designers and strong Olympic athletes.

10) Ellen van Vugt’s two One Hour Personal Bests in the VeloXS2 (79.333 km, 49.295 miles) at the Dekra Record Weekend. Ellen finished her run in the dark and with high heat conditions. She was 13th best Hour rider ever. This was Ellen's 2nd personal best of the weekend. Earlier she rode (74.8 km, 46.478 miles). She improved upon her personal best of 74 km, 46 miles set last year. The VeloXS2 was designed by David Wielemaker (formerly of TU Delft) and built by Team Elan, incluindg Hans van Vugt and Daniel Fenn, in the Beyss Leichtfahrzeuge (workshop). Ellen stayed in her position as the 2nd fastest lady ever in one-hour, but still behind Barbara's two records of 51.0 and 52.2 miles set at the Ford test track in 2009. The VeloXS2 is a narrowed version of the VeloXS that Ellen had raced in 2012 at Battle Mountain, in which she went over 70 mph. That vehicle was also designed by David.

Edited by - Upright Mike on 12/20/2013 22:28:48
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Speedbiker
human power expert

USA
3704 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  15:54:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Vehicles breaking thirty plus year old records that nobody has cared about for decades, with very unimpressive speeds do not warrant inclusion on the list. There were plenty of impressive human powered efforts this last year that deserve attention.
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  15:57:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
11) Aurélien Bonneteau‘s (124.91 kph, 77.62 mph) new French National Record for 200-meters in IUT Annecy’s Altair4. He moved past Barbara Buatois’s fastest legal speeds. She held the French national records for men or female since 2009. It was only marginally faster than his non-legal wind speed from last year. This made IUT 3rd fastest student team, because Todd Reichert’s from University of Toronto’s best speed was 0.05 mph faster. Aurélien is now the 8th fastest human on the planet after 2013 event.

12) Ben Goodall’s (115.63 kph, 71.85 mph) new Australian National Record for 200-meters in his self-built Nitroglycerin bicycle. This was an improvement by just 0.1 kph over Gareth Hank’s previous record in the Completely Overzealous trike in 2012. So Ben on two wheels was just a fraction quicker than Gareth on three-wheels. Ben also went over 70 mph last year at Battle Mountain. Ben is amongst the quickest builder/riders on the planet (defined by people who have designed, built and ridden their own machines). This list includes Matt Weaver 78.02 mph, University of Toronto riders with Todd's best of 77.68 mph, Damjan Zabovnik 77.15 mph, and just a little bit ahead of Larry Lem in the Glowworm Tandem.

13) University of Toronto’s Human Powered Helicopter Endurance records and Number of People who have flown records. These include the longest time aloft by a female, set by Alexis Reichert, Todd Reichert’s sister. She set two records of I believe 47 seconds, the 54 seconds. Trefor also set a maximum time aloft record. No one attempted the maximum altitude record that Todd achieved on the Sikorsky flight, which requires maximum power output. Also before one weekend in the fall-time, more people (12) had walked on the surface of the moon than had flown a human powered helicopter. In an incredible act of generosity, and to demonstrate just how obtainable human powered helicopter flight was, the team allowed more than a dozen people to fly the helicopter, nearly doubling the number of people worldwide who had flown. Amongst the new pilots were the team members, Professor Nogami, and representatives from Sikorsky.

14) Florian Kowalik’s near miss of the Age 14 year and Under Junior world record with a crash at 57 mph in the timing traps at Battle Mountain on Saturday morning. Florian did achieve a best of (88.71 kph, 55.12 mph) earlier. The crash was caused by windshield fogging when his team taped up a windshield vent. He became the second fastest Age 14 & Under Junior. He was aiming to break Charlie Ollinger's 57.70 mph Junior record set in 2005 with M5. Hopefully Florian will be back next year to try for Mackie Martin's 61.45 mph overall Junior record, set at Age 16 in the Virtual Rush. Florian was another of the 1st time riders at Battle Mountain this year. He was an inspiration to others throughout the event. Several times, the older riders stepped aside to let Florian run in better wind and temperature conditions with the hopes that he could set the Junior record.

15) Wil Baselman’s (127.43 kph, 79.18 mph) Personal best at Battle Mountain in the VeloX3 Wil is about 42 years old, nearly the same age as Jan Marcel van Diken, so both would have the over 40 years old best speeds. Last year Jan-Marcel went about 79.4 mph unofficially via high-speed film analysis, but missed having an official timing. So officially Wil is the 3rd fastest in the world, but could be the 4th fastest in the world and 3rd fastest Dutch-man. He was a first-time rider at Battle Mountain. Wil never got the chance to complete an One Hour run at Dekra this past summer, due to high heat, but is he did, he would have likely had a new Dutch record.

16) Phil Plath and Randy Gillett (117.53 kph, 73.03 mph) coming within 0.05 mph of the Tandem world record in the Glowworm. Everyone might remember their crash more though which occurred later in the week, and at a slower speed.

17) Ben Goodall’s Australian One Hour Record (68 km, 42.253 miles) in his self-built Nitro Glycerine This was a national record for less than a day on March 31, 2013, as Gareth Hanks later broke it, and then broke it again later in the year (see 6), At that time, Ben’s mark was the 58th best mark ever, 25th fastest one-hour rider This was at the Australian HPV Speed Trials at Ford You Yangs Proving Ground near Lara Australia. It’s a 2.97 mile oval at sea-level. Ben is a strong amateur, 34 years old. His streamlined recumbent has a top that slips over integral roll-cage sections

18) Daniel Fenn's 67.278 km One Hour in his Evo-V Velomobile for first place at the RDW/Bann Hour Race. Saturday, June 29, 2013. There was no CycleVision held at the RDW track this year, only this one-hour race. DISTANCES FROM LAST YEAR USED A 2.850 km track length based on the distances a car woudl travel the RDW track, new track length in 2013 for bicycles is 2.775 km so last years distance needs recomputation) This was just short of personal best (and the unofficial Trike Single Rider world record) he set there last year. A sub-record might be the high average speeds (almost 40 mph) of velomobiles during this year’s One-Hour race and last year’s One-Hour race on the RDW track, a 1.75 mile oval track near sea-level. Last year’s racers averaged slightly faster speeds. But these two sets of results show that with velomobiles averaging speeds of around 40 mph, they are a very fast design.

19) Bryce Marquardt (54.906 km, 34.117 miles) WORLD RECORD - Junior Age (12-14 years) ONE HOUR, finished run in dark, Became amongst the Top 100 fastest one-hour riders of all-time, and only age 14.

20) The 24-hour Pedal vs. Paddle battle between Greg K and Greg Carter on the water near Whitefish Point, Montana. Their first attempt was cut short by bad weather, rain, wind, and waves. I’m not sure if they completed the 24 hour distance. Both were attempting to better thier 24-hour distance world records on the water.

21) Todd Reichert 58.928 kph, 36.62 mph average setting a streamliner 100-lap record at the 382 meter outdoor concrete Northbrook Velodrome, one of the best contested Streamliner events in North America. 14 streamliners were racing this year. He broke Dennis Grelk’s track record by about 1 mph.

22) Chris Evans winning the BlackBear 100 mile race in a COURSE RECORD of 3:36:09 (44 kph, 27.4 mph) in a Quest streamliner, well ahead of the field. Previously Dave Johnson had won this event at least four times overall, riding the two-wheeled Great White streamliner, and held the course record of 3 hours 38 minutes. This year Dave did 3:43:25. The first nonfaired upright rider finished well back in 4:09:33, more than 33 minutes slower than Chris's winning time. The course has changed over the years. Bill Hannon (who didn't ride this year), riding a F40, and has done sub four hours before, even at age 68+. This is one of the best races in the US, where recumbents are allowed to race head-to head with uprights over a timed course. There are typically some strong road racing packs of cyclists that work together drafting, whereas a recumbent is usually on their own.

23) The incredible record smashing of UCI world records at the 250-meter indoor wooden velodrome in Aguascalientes, Mexico at the UCI World Cup Dec 6 and Dec 7, 2013. Seven record categories were broken including Men’s and Women’s 200-meters, Men’s 1 kilometer, men's team sprint (Germany), 500m time trial (Anna Meares), women's team sprint (Germany) and women's team pursuit (Great Britain). Kristina Vogel of Germany set a new 200-meter flying start world record at 10.384 sec = 69.34 kph = 43.08 mph. This new (2009 built) very fast velodrome is built of super-hard wood which may be part of its speed secret. The other is its high-altitude location of 1870 meters, 6135 feet, which is significantly lower than the outdoor 333 meter velodrome in La Paz Bolivia, but apparently quite a bit faster. What was fascinating was that not only was the records broken by one athlete, but four or five athletes broke the men’s 200-meter and kilometer records topped by 29-year old Francois Pervis of France, a rider left off the French Olympic team last year, but this year, he says he is in the best form of his life.

24) Francois Pervis Men's 1000 meter standing start: 56.303 seconds = 63.94 kph = 39.37 mph. This smashes Arnaud Tournant's 58.875 second record set in La Paz. What is even more impressive is that ten riders went under one minute for the Kilo, and this time FIVE RIDERS broke the world record. That might be like ten riders suddenly doing over 80 mph at Battle Mountain During this run, he broke the ultimate record for 1000-meters standing start time trial, previously held by Sandro Bollino's Lighting X-2 a streamlined human powered vehicle. 58.13 seconds, 38.48 mph, 61.93 kph in a straight-line Kilometer along an airport runway or public road at Interlaken, Switzerland during 1999 World Human Powered Speed Championships and Francois Pervis may have bettered the Quarter-Mile best time, unofficially held by Chris Hoy. Chris Hoy's Kilometer splits at previous events indicated that he was the fastest starter in history through the first 400 meters. If his times were extracted, he took approximately 26.2 seconds to cover the first 1/4-mile distance, which is faster than the 1/4 mile record of 26.9 seconds recognized by the IHPVA.

25) Francois Pervis Men's 200 meter flying start: 9.347 seconds = 77.03 kph = 47.86 mph. To put his in perspective, this would have broken Dr. Allan Abbotts absolute human powered speed record of 47.8 mph set in his streamlined prone at the 1976 International Speed Championships. The UCI record at that time was only about 42 mph. So in over 35 years, they’ve only improved about 5 mph, while human powered vehicle speeds have improved over 35 mph. This smashes Kévin Sireau's old world record of 9.572 seconds. By the end of the fireworks in Mexico, Kevin's time was only the 5th fastest in history. What a way to lose your world record, to have four people better it. Francois’s bike reportably used a 50 x 12 gear which equate to a required cadence of about 147 rpm to go 47.86 mph

26) Tour de France - Fastest Team Time Trial (TTT) ever (57.84 kph, 35.94 mph) by Orica-GreenEdge over 25 km in 25 minutes, 56 seconds on out and back course from Nice to Nice. Simon Gerrans maintained his yellow jersey lead as a result. Orica-GreenEdge may be most remembered for their Tour Bus becoming stuck under the Finish Line gantry on Stage one. Two other teams finished within 3 seconds. In second place was Omega Pharm Quicktep, one second back. In third place, three seconds back was Sky Pro Cycling with eventual tour winner Chris Froome. This shows how fast a team of "pro cyclists" on upright time trial machines can average in a time trial. In the 2005 Tour, Discovery Channel averaged slightly slower 57.32 kph, 35.62 mph), but over a much longer 67.5 km course which took them 70 minutes. They were aided by a tail-wind and several team members including Lance Armstrong who later admitted to performance enhancing drug use. Just two seconds behind them was Team CSC, on the new Cervelo P3C, who rode most of the way with Individual TT record setter David Zabriskie who crashed near the end.

NEW ENTRYS ---
27) Tony Martin's dominating win and speed (53.04 kph, 32.96 mph) in the longest ever (58 km) UCI World Pro Individual Time Trial Championship. He finished 46 seconds of 2012 Tour de France and Olympic TT champion Bradley Wiggins (who was not at his same form as last year), and 48 seconds of Florian Cancellera, considered one of the world's best time trialist. Tony also won the worlds in 2012. His speeds is one of the best ever speeds over that distance.

28) Sebastiaan Bowier's unfaired stock one hour distance of 51.065 km at RDW this past summer. This is probably an outdoor distance record for a stock unfaired recumbent. This was without the aid of virtually any drafting, despite other competitors on the track. Competitors circled the large 1.75 mile long RDW track. He was riding a dual 700 or 650c highracer Raptobike I believe. While not quite as far as other records set indoors on wood, it definietely shows the type of power that Sebastiaan has. The next best stock one hour finisher was Wil Baselmans with a 47.793 km distance. These distance exceeds Sean Costin's outdoor best of 46.047 km at the Ford track in 2009. Sebastiaan's mark exceeds several of the famous UCI Hour records on the track, like the classic record of Eddy Merkx, and nearly as far as Francesco Moser's famous 51.151 km hour record set in 1984 at altitude.

Edited by - Upright Mike on 12/22/2013 04:45:41
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  15:59:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Speedbiker

Vehicles breaking thirty plus year old records that nobody has cared about for decades, with very unimpressive speeds do not warrant inclusion on the list. There were plenty of impressive human powered efforts this last year that deserve attention.

Thom I believe you are referring to the Beastie's prone record. As I said, I put Graeme's effort up there for other reasons. I may move it down the list later.
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  19:45:58  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
That's great Mike.

There are probably some great achievements in Europe. Hopefully we can get folks from those locales to fill us in.

-Warren.
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Larry Lem
human power expert

South Sandwich Islands
2523 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2013 :  21:59:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Achievements or stories? Sometimes great achievements are a little dry, and sometimes great stories aren't based on a particularly significant achievement. (I see a lot of good stories above.)

Larry Lem

Edited by - Larry Lem on 12/20/2013 08:14:49
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2013 :  05:57:20  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm going for achievements. This whole website is a bit dry. Why change?
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ckaudio
recumbent enthusiast

130 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2013 :  17:53:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
sorry but must correct you Mike. I had a 3:36 at the black bear this year and am the current course record holder ( at least until Bill Hannon takes his milan to it next year) :)
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2013 :  04:41:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ckaudio

sorry but must correct you Mike. I had a 3:36 at the black bear this year and am the current course record holder ( at least until Bill Hannon takes his milan to it next year) :)

Corrected it Chris. I'm sorry I was trying to find the actual times somewhere (found them now!), but had to resort to my memory on that one!
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2013 :  06:12:04  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
We had 4 new WRRA records this year.

Larry Lem set a new Masters Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Non Faired class by riding 1 Kilo in 1:16.92 (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 29.08 MPH (46.8 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Dual 650C FWD midracer recumbent bicycle during the 1 Kilo event at the Hellyer Park Velodrome HPV Fun Day.

Followed closely by:

Phillip Plath set a new Masters Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Non Faired class by riding 1 Kilo in 1:13.61 (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 30.39 MPH (48.908 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Bacchetta Ti Aero recumbent bicycle during the 1 Kilo event at the Hellyer Velodrome.

Phillip Plath set a new Masters Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Non Faired class by riding 200 M in 12.11 sec (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 36.94 MPH (59.449 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Bacchetta Ti Aero recumbent bicycle during the 200 M event at the Hellyer Velodrome.

Sjaak Bloemberg set a new Adult Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Tail Faired class by riding 1 Kilo in 66.216 (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 33.78 MPH (54.364 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Razz Fazz IV recumbent bicycle during the 1 Kilo event at the NVHPV Wintercompetition, Netherlands.

Edited by - warren on 12/22/2013 08:17:25
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Jan v S
New Member

Netherlands
87 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2013 :  11:12:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by warren

We had 4 new WRRA records this year.

Larry Lem set a new Masters Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Non Faired class by riding 1 Kilo in 1:16.92 (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 29.08 MPH (46.8 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Dual 650C FWD midracer recumbent bicycle during the 1 Kilo event at the Hellyer Park Velodrome HPV Fun Day.

Followed closely by:

Phillip Plath set a new Masters Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Non Faired class by riding 1 Kilo in 1:13.61 (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 30.39 MPH (48.908 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Bacchetta Ti Aero recumbent bicycle during the 1 Kilo event at the Hellyer Velodrome.

Phillip Plath set a new Masters Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Non Faired class by riding 200 M in 12.11 sec (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 36.94 MPH (59.449 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Bacchetta Ti Aero recumbent bicycle during the 200 M event at the Hellyer Velodrome.

Sjaak Bloemberg set a new Adult Male World Recumbent Racing Association record in the Tail Faired class by riding 1 Kilo in 66.216 (hours:minutes:seconds) at an average speed of 33.78 MPH (54.364 KPH). This record was accomplished while riding a Razz Fazz IV recumbent bicycle during the 1 Kilo event at the NVHPV Wintercompetition, Netherlands.



Sebastiaan Bowier did already the 1K in 1:05 in Apeldoorn and several 1:06's just during indoor competition in the Netherlands.
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2013 :  17:08:55  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Masters means over 50 years old...
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Speedbiker
human power expert

USA
3704 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2013 :  19:47:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oddly,and more specifically, masters is 51 and over. 50 years and five seconds does not make a master.
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Upright Mike
human power expert

USA
3803 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2013 :  05:36:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This list couldn't possibly be complete without this big end of the year achievement..... it should belong in the Top Ten.

A) Maria Leijerstam, 35 becoming the first person to pedal to the South Pole on a human powered vehicle, She rode across the Antartic Continent in (I think) ten days to arrive by Christmas? She rode a recumbent Trike from the manufacturer ICE. It wsa equipped with wide tires, much wider than most. Her and her crew had to overcome many obstacles including the weather, dangerous crevasses in the ice, and extreme cold and wind. More on the journey http://www.whiteicecycle.com.
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2013 :  06:57:43  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Oooh, yes that's a good one Mike!
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2013 :  19:31:20  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
1) The AeroVelo / University of Toronto team members won the $250,000 Sikorsky prize for Human Powered helicopter flight.
2) Maria Leijerstam became the first person to pedal to the South Pole. She was riding a custom ICE recumbent trike
3) Maria Parker's RAAM win in the female recumbent category on a Cruzbike recumbent, and was fastest female overall.
4) Sebastiaan Bowier of the Delft team set a new Battle Mountain 200M world record of 83.13 mph
5) Team Cieo’s Tandem One Hour record of 51.582 miles at the Dekra track
6) Wil Baselmans set a (127.43 kph, 79.18 mph) Personal best at Battle Mountain in the VeloX3
7) Sebastiaan Bowier set an unofficial unfaired stock one hour distance of 32.023 miles at RDW.
8) Gareth Hanks set a 45.857 mile one hour world record in the single rider trike category.
9) Graeme Obree's prone streamliner 200M record attempts for bringing media attention to the human powered speed championships
10) Keita Saito of Tokyo Tech won the 2013 Japan International Birdman Rally which with a flight distance of over 20 kilometers.

Thanks again Mike!
-Warren.

Edited by - warren on 01/01/2014 09:16:02
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triyak
New Member

USA
75 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2013 :  12:45:07  Show Profile  Visit triyak's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I don't normally blow my own horn, but since I'm probably not on many peoples radar on this site and I fall into a strange sub-category, I'd like to remind you of my accomplishment this year.

My father, Jim Ridings and myself, Randy Ridings, designed, built, tested and rebuilt a human powered amphibian. Then I rode it 350 miles in 11 days on roads (130 miles), water (80 miles) and dirt rail-trail (140 Miles). This trip was done without aid of any support vehicle. I took all my clothing and camping gear and much of the food I ate. I did re-stock some food and a lot of water en route.

I doubt anyone has ever piloted a human-powered amphibian that far before, but I would love to be contradicted, if for no other reason than to know what to set my sights on in the future.

This may fall into the category of a better story than a record, and in that vein, I'd like to add that neither my father, a 76 yr old engineer, or myself, a 49 yr old retired Army officer had any experience with human powered craft before this project, other than me being an avid mountain biker.
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2013 :  05:40:36  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yep that sounds like it was a great adventure and it's amazing that you went that far.
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alevand
human power expert

USA
2876 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2013 :  07:27:38  Show Profile  Visit alevand's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Reaching the south pole on trike should be induced in the list of 2013 human powered achievements.

C:
Tony Levand
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2013 :  16:39:41  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yup, I have it listed as number 2!
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warren
human power expert

USA
6050 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2013 :  17:46:24  Show Profile  Visit warren's Homepage  Reply with Quote
After much consideration I think for number 10 I will choose Diana Nyad, the 64-Year-Old Swimmer who broke the World Record for Distance Swimming by crossing the 103 mile stretch of water between Cuba and Florida unassisted and in 53 hours.

Arg no I can't use that - no machines involved.

Ok, Keita Saito of Tokyo Tech's Meister club, won the 2013 Japan International Birdman Rally which was held on the eastern shore of Lake Biwa on July 28, 2013. Meister participated in the human-powered aircraft distance rally category and won with a flight distance of 20,399 m. Still far shy of Kanellos Kanellopoulos (Greece), who pedalled his Daedalus 88 aircraft 115.11 km (71.52 miles) from Heraklion, Crete, to the Greek island of Santorini on 23 April 1988. His epic flight lasted 3 hr 54 min 59 sec before an offshore gust broke off the plane's tail and it crashed into the sea a few feet from the shore.



Edited by - warren on 12/31/2013 18:09:14
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