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MARS projects - VFS - Origin of the mold
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Origin of the Mold

In the summer of 2002, a long-time HPV enthusiast named Bruce Boone (one-time maker of titanium chainrings and cogs, now maker of -- no kidding -- titanium wedding bands: http://www.boonerings.com) put an ad up on the Internet offering a set of streamliner shell molds free to a good home. It was an old project that had languished (the molds had been sitting on a shelf for years), and Bruce was about to move. So, he decided to let them go.

Knowing the incredible amount of time, money and effort it takes to create a mold, Andy Douglas immediately responded and within a few days was on his way to Florida to pick them up.

Bruce's original idea was to build a speedbike for the purpose of breaking some records, and had made a muffler-pipe test chassis before stopping work. Called Momentum II, it's a triangulated over-the-shoulder design. The shell is more or less the same size and shape as the Whitehawk.



Bruce used an interesting method to make the mold. Rather than going the traditional route of making a fiberglass plug and pulling a mold off of it, he made the plug out of insulation foam and coated it with plaster of Paris. He then took the plug to a bathtub maker, who sprayed gelcoat and a 0.5" thick layer of chopper-gun fiberglass on it. When cured, Bruce cut the thing in half, and voila... a mold. The surface is not as glossy-smooth as most streamliner molds, but it's well-suited to the purpose of molding Zote foam streamliner shells.

Next section: Mold measurements and preparation